Trabuco – Ancient War Machine

The Trabuco, which was an ancient war machine, was an attack weapon that was used during the Middle Ages. Armies used the machine for attack upon enemy territory. In essence, it was machine fashioned after a giant sling shot or catapult. It could force shots of up to 100 plus pounds at heavy speeds towards the enemy target. Ammo could bust through walls or fortress to penetrate enemy lines.

The Trabuco was designed to be an amped up, improved version of a launcher. The goal was to provide a better weight distribution to destroy the intended target. The design is simple in that a long piece of wood is placed on a lever. The lever is attached to a manual motor and tied to the sling which provides stabilization. To provide extra tension the person launching can pull the threated that are attached to the weight according to merriam-webster.com.

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Prior to the invention of guns and the use of gun powder the Trabuco was the go to weapon of choice. During the Middle Ages looting was prevalent as well as rape and destruction in general. People chose to protect themselves by building walls around entire cities. The only way to penetrate these cities was to use brute force. The Trabuco was able to use force to shoot heavy weight into invading territory. It was heavily used during the Christian Crusades to gain access into enemy territory and penetrate barriers. During the Crusades the Trabuco saw several updates. Europeans were able to better calculate the exertion required to gain more precise results. The machine was also used as an early form of germ warfare. According to redetrabuco.com.br, dead bodies were attached to the sling and tossed over walls in the hopes of contaminating enemy territory. With the advent of the gun in the thirteenth century the Trabuco feel by the wayside and eventually was eliminated as a weapon of choice.

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